Single Origin Project June: Ethiopia Guji Kercha

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ABOUT THE FARM

The road south out of Addis Ababa leads straight to coffee country. The new highway toll road makes travel to the lowlands quicker than ever, but the pace slows down when the road starts to climb into the mountains. At Shashamane town, the western road carries travelers into the heart of the Sidama Guji coffee region, past family farms and pointed huts made of curved reeds.

Thousands of small farmers live in this area, growing coffee at high altitudes where the Rift Valley meets the Bale Mountains. Farms range in size from 1 to 20 hectares, and banana and mango trees grow alongside coffee trees, imparting their fruity flavors into the soil. For hundreds of years, people here have governed by the Gadaa system, an indigenous democratic process of electing a leader and local representatives.

The area is rich in history – and rich in coffee. Producers bring their ripe harvests to central washing stations, where the cherries are pulped and washed with mountain spring water the same day. The pulped coffee goes into a fermentation tank for 72 hours, then is washed, spread, and sun-dried for up to 2 weeks on raised beds. The people of the Guji region take pride in the high quality of this sweet, clean coffee.

Single Origin Project May: Honduras Pablo Cruz

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ABOUT THE FARM

Beneficio San Vicente is a family owned and operated dry mill and exporter located in the town of Pena Blanca in Northwestern Honduras. Founder and longtime coffee buyer Fidel Paz constructed the current milling facility in 2000 as production in the surrounding area (Santa Barbara) increased, affording the family the opportunity to connect their producing community directly to international buyers. San Vicente does not buy their coffees as an intermediary, but rather connects these producers directly to buyers for more transparent price negotiations. Coffees produced within the San Vicente community frequently place as finalists in the national Cup of Excellence competition year after year, establishing the mill and family as a globally recognized leader among specialty coffee producers in Honduras.

Single Origin Project April: Burundi Gahahe

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ABOUT THE FARM

Gahahe was built in 1989 in the Kayanza commune and province. The name ‘Gahahe’ comes from the Igihahe trees that were once found in this region. Due to the number of these trees in this region, the Kirundi phrase kubavomere batumisha was used to describe the land, which means ‘always covered in green’. This washing station collects cherries from over 1,250 local coffee farmers spread over the 16 neighboring colonies.

Single Origin Project March: Guatemala Waykan

ABOUT THE FARM

Waykan is a pristine example of the dynamic character of coffees from Huehuetenango. Its crisp stone fruit acidity is perfectly balanced by flavors of toffee and sweet almonds. In the Maya Q’qnjobal dialect in the region, waykan means “star, or light that shines in the sky at night.” Coffee plays a large role in Huehuetenango accounting either directly or indirectly for roughly 80 percent of the local economy.