single origin project

Single Origin Project November: Ethiopia Kayon Mountain

ABOUT THE FARM

The Kayon Mountain Coffee Farm is owned by multiple families that have been born and raised around the experience of coffee. These shareholding members had mainly been supplying coffee to auction for the past 30 years until they started their farm in 2012. This farm boasts a 500 hecatare spread, of which half is planted in heirloom Typica coffee and the other land reserved for cabbage, and indigenous shade trees. By 2015, they had implemented washing stations and dry-hullers allowing them to start exporting their own coffees and now see an annual production of about 300 tonnes. The coffees see an average fermentation time of 24–36 hours, followed by an average drying time of 12–20 days. As for the future, Kayon Mountain plans to plant more coffee, improve the quality of their processing, and even begin leasing more land to expand their practice.

Single Origin Project October: Colombia Montalvo

ABOUT THE FARM

This is an Excelso EP grade coffee from the Planadas municipality of the Tolima department in Colombia. Specifically, this coffee is comprised of harvests from AGPROCEM (ASOCIACIÓN DE AGRICULTORES Y PRODUCTORES DE CAFÉ ESPECIAL DE MONTALVO). Growing altitude across the farms ranges from 1650 - 2000 MASL and varieties grown include Caturra, Castillo, Typica, and Colombia. This producer association is comprised of 58 members and was founded in 2014. 

Single Origin Project September: Guatemala Waykan

ABOUT THE FARM

Waykan is a pristine example of the dynamic character of coffees from Huehuetenango. Its crisp stone fruit acidity is perfectly balanced by flavors of toffee and sweet almonds. In the Maya Q’qnjobal dialect in the region, waykan means “star, or light that shines in the sky at night.” Coffee plays a large role in Huehuetenango accounting either directly or indirectly for roughly 80 percent of the local economy.

Single Origin Project August: Ethiopia Gera

ABOUT THE FARM

Four hundred kilometers southwest of Addis Ababa, this sweet, bright coffee grows in the Gera district near the city of Djimma. The area just north of the Gojeb River is full of diverse crops. Spices, corn, and teff (a grain used to make Ethiopia’s spongy bread, injera) all grow here, and higher up, you’ll find coffee. The soil here is a rich, red soil with high clay content, called nitosol that is great for growing flavorful coffee. In Gera, bean quality literally starts from the ground up.

Gera is known for cooler, wetter weather. The highland climate is shadier and receives 8 months of rainfall, resulting in well-irrigated coffee that is bursting with flavor. The coffee trees here grow under a natural forest, allowing the beans to develop more slowly and take on fuller flavors.

This coffee is handpicked by small farmers, then pulped, washed, and laid out to dry. This region has historically produced natural dried coffees, but many are turning their efforts towards specialty washed coffee – with delicious results. After drying, the washed beans are then carefully sorted to remove any defects, allowing the natural flavors of heirloom coffee varieties to carry through into the cup.

Single Origin Project July: Ethiopia Tega & Tula

ABOUT THE FARM

Tega & Tula Specialty Coffee Farm is named after the two nearby villages of Tega and Tula, found in the woreda, or district, of Gibo, in Keffa, Ethiopia. The farm is 500 hectares in size, with nearly 400 hectares planted in coffee, primarily Ethiopian varieties and cultivars that were released in the late 1970s (74110 and 74112, for example, are the "names" of two of these cultivars from 1978), as well as some wild coffee from the Keffa forests, as the farm is in the Keffa bio-reserve area.

The lots designated for natural processing are laid on raised beds after picking, where it takes between 20–25 days to dry.